Command line shortcut for lengthy SSH commands

May 31, 2007 - 4 Comments

We love tips that make your computing life easier, and this command line tip from Cedrik Morgan falls into that category:

“If you have a server that you commonly access a nice way to avoid typing a lengthy command like ‘ssh 192.168.1.100 -l admin’ over and over again is to create an alias in your .profile, here’s how to set it up:

From the command line use a text editor, I’ll suggest nano because it’s easy to use, type:
nano .profile
and add the following line to your .profile:
alias servername="ssh serverIP.com -l username -p port"
now instead of typing out the ful ‘ssh serverIP blah blah’ command, you can just type servername, much easier! “

Thanks Cedrik! We’ve covered the alias command a bit in the past with the article titled Launching GUI Applications from the Terminal, check it out for more info.

Enjoy this tip? Subscribe to the OSXDaily newsletter to get more of our great Apple tips, tricks, and important news delivered to your inbox! Enter your email address below:

Related articles:

Posted by: Bill Ellis in Command Line, Mac OS X, Tips & Tricks

4 Comments

» Comments RSS Feed

  1. Weaver says:

    not a bad tip, but I think Cedrik must have been living under a rock for 10 years because the alias command has been used in unix for eternity

  2. Dave Smith says:

    Use ~/.ssh/config for this sort of thing. Look at

    man ssh_config

  3. lar3ry says:

    Here’s a way to do make an alias permanent without having to resort to a text editor in bash:

    add_alias ()
    {
    local aname=$1;
    shift;
    echo “alias $aname=\”$@\”” | tee >> “$HOME/.bashrc”;
    eval “alias $aname=\”$@\””
    }

    Once this handy function is in your .bashrc, you can just type:

    $ add_alias servername ssh -p 800 username@servername

    That will create the alias “servername” and add it to the end of your .bashrc so the next time you start up a terminal session, the alias will be available again.

  4. Alaina says:

    I love aliasing, but for this, ~/.ssh/config is an infinitely superior solution.

Leave a Reply

 

Shop for Apple & Mac Deals on Amazon.com

Subscribe to OSXDaily

Subscribe to RSS Subscribe to Twitter Feed Follow on Facebook Subscribe to eMail Updates